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  • Kristen Herring-Asleson

So You Want to be on a Podcast?


Do you listen to podcasts? Some people love them, yet for others, podcasts are boring and are used to assist in falling asleep. I find that some podcasts provide inspiration and make the “wheels start turning” and others are too dry.


But everyone has different and unique topics that are intriguing and useful for them.

Back a few decades, as a young person in a fairly new career, my boss told everyone in a leadership position that our cars should be “learning universities,” and that podcasts were beneficial, even if only a nugget of wisdom was gleaned from each one.

About six months ago, I saw an application on social media to be a podcast guest for a new series to be released in the fall. On a whim, I filled out the application, shared my business and personal background, and offered my thoughts on multiple questions. Much to my surprise, an email popped up in July asking if I wanted to be a guest. Of course, I was incredibly excited and accepted. Afterall, being a podcast guest has potential to reach far more people than my social media posts.


Now, am I an expert on all things in business? Nope. Am I an expert on all situations one would face in a lifetime? Nope, but I have been through a lot.


For anyone who knows more about at least one subject than most other people, that makes you an expert of sorts. Podcast guests are positioned as experts on the subjects they speak about, or they wouldn’t be on them.


As of April 2020, 50% of homes had someone tuned in to podcasts according to podcastinsights.com. That is more than 60 million homes that may tune in and hear you. Have a website? Podcasters almost always put a link to their guest’s websites in the show notes, leading to more traffic on your site.


If being a guest on a podcast piques your interest, here are a few tips from "The Scope of Practice:"

  • Reach out to podcasts you already listen to. Choose one(s) that are smaller and have a more focused niche. Until you truly position yourself as an authority, larger podcasts may reject you.

  • Visit Apple Podcasts’ directory site. Everything is organized by subject. Once you find a podcast that you would like to be a guest on, go to their website and send them a message.

  • Make sure the podcast is relevant to what you do. For example, if you are a financial adviser, requesting a guest spot on a cooking show would not provide the networking opportunity or the reach that would help your business grow.

  • Make sure the podcast also aligns with your values. Some podcasts get political, and some endorse views you may not support. Don’t compromise your values for the promotion you get from it.

  • Send a personal email to the host. Sending a form letter shows you don't really know what the podcast is about or that you've not researched the show.

  • Send your suggested topic ideas in a gracious and business-like email. If you can save the show's makers time, that is a tremendous value.

Finally, tune in Sep. 19, to hear my guest spot on “Package Your Brilliance: Discovering How to Turn a Brilliant Idea into a Product or Service.”

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